Consuming Caffeinated or Non-Caffeinated Energy Shots has No Effect on Mood or Performance Original Research

Main Article Content

Jose Antonio
Tobin Silver
Peter Byers
Lia Jiannine

Keywords

nootropic, supplement, attention, vigilance

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of two different energy drinks on mood as well as mental and physical performance.  


Methods:  In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled investigation, subjects (n=60, 22 male, 38 female) were assigned to a caffeinated energy shot (Alpha Brain), a non-caffeinated energy shot (Ginger Rescue), or a placebo with no caffeine. Subjects were pre-tested on the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT), which is a measure of sustained attention, Profile of Mood States, and handgrip strength. Consequently, they consumed either the Alpha Brain shot, Ginger Rescue shot, or the placebo. One hour post-consumption, the assessments were repeated.


Results: There were no between-group differences (p>0.05) for any of the assessments regarding the change score (M±SD): PVT – Alpha Brain -3±15 msec, Ginger Rescue -21±60 msec, Placebo 1±21 msec; Total mood disturbance score – Alpha Brain -7.0±14.5, Ginger Rescue -4.1±11.1, Placebo -0.7±8.5; Peak handgrip – Alpha Brain 0.3±3.5 kg, Ginger Rescue 0.3±4.5 kg, Placebo -0.6±3.1 kg.


Conclusions: The acute consumption of an energy shot, regardless of whether it is caffeinated, did not affect mood, handgrip strength, or sustained attention.

Abstract 1124 | PDF Downloads 167

References

1. Jagim AR, Harty PS, Tinsley GM, et al. International society of sports nutrition position stand: energy drinks and energy shots. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2023;20(1):2171314.
2. Quinlivan A, Irwin C, Grant GD, et al. The effects of Red Bull energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time-trial performance. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2015;10(7):897-901.
3. Schubert MM. Caffeinated" Energy Shots" and Distance Running Performance in Trained Runners. 2011.
4. Schubert MM, Astorino TA, Azevedo Jr JL. The effects of caffeinated “energy shots” on time trial performance. Nutrients. 2013;5(6):2062-2075.
5. Wesnes KA, Barrett ML, Udani JK. An evaluation of the cognitive and mood effects of an energy shot over a 6 h period in volunteers. A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over study. Appetite. 2013;67:105-113.
6. Pereira A, Araújo A, Cabaços C, et al. Profile of mood states-12: same validity, more usability. European Psychiatry. 2023;66(S1):S553-S554.
7. Seifert JG, Connor DA. The influence of commercial energy shots on response time and power output in recreational cyclists. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2014;11(1):56.
8. Mumford PW, Tribby AC, Poole CN, et al. Effect of caffeine on golf performance and fatigue during a competitive tournament. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2016;48(1):132-138.